In a perfect world, we’d walk out of the shower with unbelievably swishy, just-returned-from-the-salon tresses that quickly air-dry. The twin pressures of frizz and flyaway, on the other hand, must be dealt with in the real world. If you look closely, you’ll notice that the main cause is the damp hair regimen. Are you guilty of brushing your hair straight after a shower to untangle the knots? Or do you want to zap it with a high-heat blow-dryer to get rid of the moisture quickly?

7 Frequent Blunders You’re Doing with Damp Hair that are Silently Harming Your Tresses!

Perhaps you’re tempted to tie it up and get it out of the way so you can get on with your morning routine? The bad news is that all of these blunders might be doing havoc on your hair’s health and lifespan. Here are some common blunders you don’t want to make with your damp tresses.

1) Brushing Your Damp Hair

Brushing damp hair is a cardinal haircare sin since the hair is at its weakest and most prone to breaking, resulting in flyaways, split ends, and damage. Allow a brush to contact your hair only when it is almost or totally dry to ensure the life of your strands.

2) Using Heated Equipment on Damp Hair

While hot tools can damage your hair on their own, using them on wet or damp hair exacerbates the problem. When you use a hot flat iron or tong on wet hair, the damp hair amps up the heat to dangerous levels, frying your strands and inflicting irreparable damage. You may use the hairstyling equipment of your choice after your hair is totally dry, but only after using a heat protectant.

3) Tying Hair Up When It’s Still Wet

It can be tempting to wrap it up in a bun to get it out of the way on a hectic morning. However, we already know that when hair strands are wet, they are at their weakest and most susceptible. The tension in your hair will build as it dries if you tie it up or braid it firmly when it’s dripping wet. When the hair is moist, the normal dents and snags that might occur in a dry ponytail become worse. As a general guideline, make sure your hair is totally dry before tying it up.

4) Drying Soaking Wet Hair Using a Blow Dryer

This may be the most difficult guideline to follow, but never blow-dry your hair when it is still damp. It may be tempting to get out of the shower and start wicking the moisture away with your blow-dryer on the highest setting, but you should wait for the water to drain before applying the dryer on medium heat and gradually increasing the heat to style your hair as desired.

5) Airdrying Hair After Coming Out of a Shower

Airdrying your hair is always a risk—one wrong move and you’ll be dealing with uncontrollable frizz until your next hair wash. It goes without saying that wiping wet hair with a cotton towel forcefully will cause it to break more readily. To avoid any mishaps, use a microfiber towel to gently press the water out of your strands before letting it air dry.

6) Having Damp Hair While Going to Bed

It’s acceptable to go to bed with somewhat damp hair, but dripping wet hair is not. It destroys the follicle and causes breakage, in addition to leaving a puddle on your pillowcase. If you’ve had your hair washed before bed, opt to blast-dry—not blow-dry—it with a hairdryer to remove at least 70% of the moisture, or let it air dry until it’s just a little damp.

7) Spraying Wet Hair with Hairspray

When your style is ready to be fastened down, which means it must be dry, you should use hairspray. Because the form of your hair and the style it creates alter as it dries, it’s ideal to apply hairspray when your hair is completely dry for a long-lasting grip.

Lastly, wrapping your hair in a towel after a shower, though many of us do it, can actually harm your hair because the abrasive fibers of the towel are hard on the strands and cause damage. Instead, use a cotton t-shirt or a microfiber towel to absorb sweat and reduce friction. Get it from an eBay alternative.

Posted by:Tanvi Punia

Blogger and Content Writer The Silent Scribbler ✍️♥️

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